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Cat & Dog Wormers

Worms are parasites that can infect the family pet; there are many different types of worms cats and dogs can contract, some of which can be extremely dangerous.

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Cat & Dog Wormers (continued)

Felines can be infected with a range of parasites, these are generally referred to as worms. Cats present greater difficulty for worming when compared to most other animals, this is because a lot of cats are left to roam around freely, without returning to their owners for long periods of time. This behaviour increases the chances of the cat contracting infections from other animals and the environment. Cats are at risk of infections from many different species of worms, some residing in different parts of the cat’s anatomy, and feeding in a variety of ways. Cats may not present symptoms of an infection for some time, which will allow infestation to grow and become more serious, eventually if untreated leading to death. Prevention is not an option for parasitic worm infections, however killing the worms is possible with many of the flea product on the market. Worms pose a serious health risk to the animals we love, and we should regularly worm them to give them the best quality of life. Not only are worms dangerous to our pets but they can also be extremely dangerous to humans, making a careful worming program essential.

Dogs can contract worms from a whole range of sources: grass, mud and gardens are just a few examples, where dogs are at risk. Worm eggs are microscopic so it is extremely difficult to prevent your dog from contracting the parasite… treatment and protection is usually the only solution. There are many different types of worms dogs can contract, and these sustain themselves in a number of ways. Some worms, such as the tapeworm, feed off the food dog’s food supply, while others, like the heartworm, feed off the blood supply of the dog. Symptoms of an infection include: vomiting, diahorrea, weight loss, low energy and signs of eggs in faecal matter. If your dog shows any sign of worms it is important to get it to a vet as soon as possible, better still be proactive and regularly worm your dogs to prevent infections taking hold. Many of these parasites can be contacted by humans, and if you pet has an infestation then you too can be at greater risk. It is therefore vital that your dog is treated for the safety of the animal and humans alike.