Cell Count

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Short Overview

The most prominent role of vitamin C is its immune-stimulating effect; very important in a stressed competition animal. It is also a powerful antioxidant that destroys toxic free radicals and it regenerates other antioxidants such as vitamin E. Both of these functions are crucial to the athletic animal. Additionally the vitamin is required for the synthesis of collagen giving structure to connective tissues such as found in bones, tendons, etc. Other roles include assistance with iron absorption and the synthesis of some peptide hormones and neurotransmitters essential for normal bodily function.

Product Overview

The most prominent role of vitamin C is its immune-stimulating effect; very important in a stressed competition animal. It is also a powerful antioxidant that destroys toxic free radicals and it regenerates other antioxidants such as vitamin E. Both of these functions are crucial to the athletic animal. Additionally the vitamin is required for the synthesis of collagen giving structure to connective tissues such as found in bones, tendons, etc. Other roles include assistance with iron absorption and the synthesis of some peptide hormones and neurotransmitters essential for normal bodily function. In addition to vitamin C the other vitamins present are members of the B complex that are vital for optimising energy metabolism. The latter includes vitamins B1, B2, B5, B6, B12, niacin and folic acid. These vitamins play a crucial role in fat and carbohydrate metabolism and are obtained from the diet or from microbial synthesis within the large intestine. As animals change from maintenance feeding (mostly forage) to diets that will support physical activity (cereal-rich), the nature of the daily ration changes thus affecting both the dietary supply of these vitamins as well as the extent of their synthesis within the digestive tract. As a result, supplements of these vitamins can be extremely beneficial. In particular, additional B12 is required to help utilise propionic acid that results from the fermentation of starch. This vitamin can also act as an appetite stimulant for animals in hard work. Blood values of B12 in Camels in training can be lowered unless receiving dietary supplementation. There is some suggestion that dietary requirements of both thiamine and folic acid are increased for these animals when compared to those that are not working.